Furi: So Hard It’s Fun

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I spent all of this week trying to down the second boss in Furi, one of July’s PS Plus freebies. I don’t normally play games in the “so hard it’s fun” genre. I like some challenge in my games but I’m not a fan of the all challenge all the time style. But after playing Dark Souls 2  last weekend, I was in the mood to test my difficulty limits.

The story began with a pretty cut-scene. I escaped from my cell,and picked a fight with my captor, the Warden. The fight, which was basically the tutorial, went well. I lost some lives but overall I beat him on my first try.  Brimming with confidence, I started the long walk down to the next level and the new boss all while a man with a rabbit head filled me in on her. Upon arrival I was thoroughly trounced again and again by the Hunter.

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In this twin stick shooter/hack and slash game, each boss has 6 phases and each phase you are given full health and 3 lives. If you lose a life during a phase the phase starts over and the boss gets their health back. Lose all three lives and the whole thing starts from phase one again. Starting over and over had me yelling at my TV more than I’d care to admit. Everything you just did for the past 20 minutes didn’t count.

That’s what I thought at first. But as I came back to challenge the boss once or twice a day  I noticed I was getting better. Taking the approach of playing it a little each day instead of trying to power through it for hours definitely helped make it least frustrating.  I was dying less during the early phases, I started having more health on my last life on the later phases, my parries were getting better and I knew the attack animations and how to avoid them. I was getting better as a player. What surprised me was that even though I wasn’t going anywhere in the game, I felt like I was progressing.Finally on Friday I kicked the second boss into a pit with a cry of victory  and was on my way to the third. Maybe this one won’t take so long to beat.

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Backlogged: Tengami and Where is My Heart?

I haven’t done this in a while. July has been a crazy month for me in my non gaming life. Between going on vacation and taking on some more responsibilities at work  there hasn’t been a whole lot of time to work on my backlog. These games I actually finished back in June but haven’t had the chance to write about them. Both were under 2 hours long, I wish Tengami was longer but Where is My Heart? couldn’t end soon enough.

Tengami

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Developer: Nyamnyam

Playtime: 114 minutes

Tengami is a point and click puzzle game in a world that looks like its made out of paper. The game itself  reminds me of an interactive pop-up book complete with tabs to pull and flaps to flip. The goal of the game is to go through each level and find a flower to put back onto the Cherry Blossom tree.

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Each of the four levels reflect the four changing seasons and have a few puzzles to solve on each. The puzzles are difficult but not impossible to solve without hints. The glowing circles on the interactive parts of the world were very helpful. While I tried to use hints sparingly, there were some puzzles I just couldn’t wrap my head around to start until I looked up a walkthrough.

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At the end of each level you are rewarded with a Haiku

While it did feel a like cheating to use a walkthrough for some puzzles, I really wanted to see more of the world. I love the art in this game, it’s simple,unique and very visually pleasing. Couple that with the great soundtrack and you can see why I didn’t want to spend hours figuring out that a few symbols were actually Japanese numbers.

I wish the game was longer. It seemed as soon as I was really getting into it it was over. That’s one of the issues with short games. Overall it plays really well, the character walks a bit slow but other than that it’s a really enjoyable experience that I highly recommend.

Where Is My Heart?

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Where is My Heart? They’re all over the place.

Developer: Schulenburg Software

Playtime: 98 minutes

I picked up this game in a Humble bundle a year or two ago. What started off as a cute platformer with an interesting idea became a headache after about 10 levels. Where is My Heart tells the story of a family of forest spirits whose world has been fractured. You are tasked with guiding them through each level to put their world back together and gather  hearts.

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Hey Ma, I’m in two places at once!

The main feature of the game is the shattered world, the level is broken up into different pieces and shuffled around. This adds a challenge to the platforming. Jumping out of one square could drop you into one across the screen. After a few levels, this becomes more of an annoyance than anything special. It’s not the easiest platforming and when you don’t know exactly where your character is jumping to, it ends in a lot of missed jumps and miserable deaths.I wouldn’t recommend trying to play this in one sitting, I ended up with a headache trying to keep track of how all the shattered pieces were connected together.

Each forest spirit can power up and transform to have different abilities. This adds a few more mechanics to the game. For example the Rainbow spirit, who looks like a fluffy marshmallow, jump and rotate the screens to get to hard to reach places. The Deer spirit can jump higher than the rest and the bat spirit can reveal hidden passages and platforms.

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The spirits are allergic to spikes and water. I must have died 50 times on this levle.

I think I would have liked the game if it was a normal platformer. It’s challenging enough as such but throwing in the confusing, jigsaw, shattered levels makes it frustrating. I understand why they did this, it’s a unique idea and it is fun for the first few levels and if you took this feature away, it’d be just another retro looking platformer.

Pokemon Go: Keep Out

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Like many, I’ve spent the last couple weeks living out my childhood dream of setting out and collecting Pokemon for real. The hunt has brought me to places I’ve never been, I’ve met some people I otherwise wouldn’t have, and I’ve stopped in the middle of a sidewalk or a store more times than I can count.

Pokemon Go hit and it hit hard. Almost every store, restaurant, or bar in my neighborhood has some sort of deal for Pokemon Go players. Every night there are people young and old wandering the streets with their eyes glued to their phone. From my apartment I hear the yells and cheers of people who have finally found the little critter they’ve been searching for, usually right under my bed room window at 3am…while I don’t really mind, it seems like more than a few people do.

I’ve slowly seen more and more “Private Property: No Trespassing” signs pop up around town. There are three right around my apartment. There are a few more around more of the popular Pokestops as well. The majority  I’ve seen in the residential part of town on people’s front yards,I guess not everyone wants hordes of people standing around their house or business in the middle of the night. Even where there aren’t signs posted I’ve seen a few people jup fences and even one wandering around a construction sites.

Just because we’re playing a game doesn’t mean we should wander around places we aren’t welcome. Especially other people’s yards, you would think this would be common sense but apparently it’s a problem around here. While there are Pokemon everywhere, maybe we as players shouldn’t be going everywhere.

 

 

 

Taking Inventory

Hello, hi, and welcome to my very first post here at I’m Not Squishy! This blog will chronicle my adventures through my backlog and serve as a platform to write about my unyielding love for MMOs,RPGs, and video games of every flavor.

Now I know what your thinking, having a backlog of video games is probably the biggest first world problem right next to the Starbucks running out of whip cream. Why does it matter if these games go unfinished? Well the truth is it doesn’t, but it sounds like a whole lot of fun trying to beat as many as I can!

Meet the Backlog:

It’s always best to know what your up against when you start a project. I took the time to actually look through my Bin O’ Games and see just how many games I have left to complete. The break down looks something like this:

PlayStation 4: 9 unfinished games*

8 PS4 Games
*Digital Download: Tom Clancy’s The Division

 

PlayStation 3: 32 unfinished games*

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*Digital Downloads: Mass Effect 1, 2 and 3, Ni No Kuni Wrath of the White Witch

 

3DS/DS: 7 unfinished Games*

5 3DS games and a DS game
* Digital Download: Little Battlers Experience

 

Things didn’t seem so bad until I opened up my Steam Library. When I did….oh god, the horror!  I’ve only had steam for 2 years and only discovered Humble Bundle last year. This has resulted in a whopping 79 unfinished games, many of which I never even started up.  According to http://www.howlongtobeatsteam.com, it would take about a month of playing 24/7 to beat the main story in all of my games.

I’ve decided to tackle my Steam Library and my PS4 collection first because I can take pretty screenshots easily. (Full disclosure, my laptop is 4 years old and runs an Intel 4000 integrated graphics chip so the screen shots from steam may not be so pretty.) For Steam I’m going to start with the games that take the least time to beat and work my way up. For PS4, PS3, and 3DS I’m going to play whatever I’m in the mood for.

I’m going to consider the game beaten once the credits role and/or the last level is beaten, the main story is over, the goal is obtained at which point there names will be immortalized on the Games Beaten page.  Actually after sitting down and going through the collection I have found some games to add to the games beaten page.